Pet Vaccinations

Pet vaccinations are important for all dogs and cats; even the ones that remain indoors most, if not all, of the time because they could still catch an airborne virus from outside at potty time or through an open window or door screen. More often than not, viruses are spread due to contact with other infected animals that are wild or whose owners did not elect to keep their pet vaccinations up to date. Given the violent and progressive nature of small-animal viruses, it is of the utmost importance to immunize your pet and opt to keep your kitty current with the latest cat vaccinations and your pooch up to date with his or her dog vaccinations.
For adult pets, we recommend vaccine appointments

ANNUALLY.

Depending on your pet’s age and vaccination history, your veterinarian might recommend a custom vaccination plan.

Dog Vaccinations

Distemper, Parvovirus, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza (DA2PP) Vaccine is a combination vaccine that protects your dog from multiple viruses. Puppies 3 to 6 months are most at risk for contracting these diseases sometimes resulting in fatalities. We recommend three DA2PP vaccinations for your puppy spread over the first 8 to 16 weeks of his life followed by boosters every 3 years.

Commonly known as kennel cough, cases of bordetella often present after contact with other infected dogs at boarding facilities, day care, grooming or dog parks. Coughing and gagging are often the only symptoms. The vaccination protects your dog for up to a year. If you are planning to vaccinate your dog for bordetella for the first time it needs a booster in two to three weeks.

Spread through the urine of wildlife, leptospirosis can lead to acute kidney failure in dogs. It can also be spread from dogs to humans. This vaccine is given to dogs that are likely to ingest contaminated water and is good for up to one year. If you are planning to vaccinate your dog for leptospirosis for the first time, it will needs a booster in two to three weeks.

Canine Influenza Virus (CIV) Vaccine: 
Canine influenza, or the “canine flu,” is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by an influenza A virus. Dogs that may benefit from the canine influenza vaccination include those that receive the kennel cough (bordetella/parainfluenza) vaccine, because the risk groups are similar. This vaccination protects your dog for up to a year. If you are planning to vaccinate your dog for canine influenza for the first time, it needs a booster in three weeks.

Rabies Vaccine: Rabies is a zoonotic virus that causes acute encephalitis (swelling of the brain) that can often be fatal. It is transmitted through a bite from an infected animal. After the first vaccination, your pet is protected for one year and then three years from their second vaccination on. 

Cat Vaccinations

Rabies Vaccine: Rabies is a zoonotic virus that causes acute encephalitis (swelling of the brain) that can often be fatal. It is transmitted through a bite from an infected animal. After the first vaccination, your pet is protected for one year and then three years from their second vaccination on.

Panleukopenia, Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus (FVRCP) Vaccine: This is a combination vaccine that protects your cat from multiple viruses. Kittens are most at risk for contracting these diseases, especially if they are indoor/outdoor felines.

Leukemia (FeLV) Vaccine: Feline leukemia virus is the leading viral killer of cats. The virus is spread from cat-to-cat through bite wounds, through casual contact with infected cats, and from an infected mother cat to her kittens. The individuals most at risk of infection are outdoor cats, indoor/outdoor cats, and cats exposed to such individuals. Cats living in households with FeLV-infected cats or with cats of unknown infection status are also at risk. Indoor-only cats with no exposure to potentially infected cats are extremely unlikely to become infected. 

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) Vaccine: FIV is similar to FeLV as it is contracted from bites or scratches from infected cats. Infected cats may appear normal for years. However, infection eventually leads to a state of immune deficiency that hinders the cat’s ability to protect itself against other infections. The same bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and fungi that may be found in the everyday environment–where they usually do not affect healthy animals–can cause severe illness in those with weakened immune systems. These secondary infections are responsible for many of the diseases associated with FIV.

Rabbit Vaccination

Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus

As you may have heard, Colorado and the southwestern US is experiencing an outbreak of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV-2). This virus only causes disease in wild and domestic rabbits and is easily spread through contact with infected animals and surfaces, including footwear and clothing that those animals may have touched. This disease is often characterized by a bloody nose and sudden death of a rabbit. Cases of RHDV-2 have recently been reported as close as Weld County.

We do not typically vaccinate rabbits in the United States, but due to this outbreak we are recommending all healthy rabbits be vaccinated against RHDV-2. There is a vaccine available for this disease, but requires special state and USDA approval to import from Europe. We are fortunate to be one of the few hospitals in Colorado to have attained the vaccine, and have begun offering vaccinations in order to protect our local rabbits.

If you are interested in having your rabbit vaccinated against RHDV-2, please call our office to schedule. All rabbits must be in good health and will need to undergo an exam in order to be vaccinated. We are also offering discounted microchipping, courtesy of the Colorado House Rabbit Society, at the same time as the vaccine. If you have a regularly scheduled annual exam with a doctor, this is also a good time to get the vaccination, but please call our office to let us know that you would be interested in receiving the vaccine during your appointment.

Please feel free to contact our office with additional questions, including the eligibility of your rabbit for this vaccine. Please be patient as we are doing our best at scheduling these appointments in a timely fashion on top of an already full schedule. We will have more than enough vaccines to ensure all those who want their rabbits to be vaccinated, can do so.

If you would like more information about RHDV-2, including biosecurity measures, case updates, and press releases, we encourage you to visit this website: https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/aganimals/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-virus-rhdv2

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